To the heritage villages of Himachal Pradesh

Pragpur, a quaint little village in Himachal Pradesh’s scenic Kangra Valley, became the first village in India to be branded a heritage village. Pragpur was founded in the late 16th century by the Kuthiala Soods in memory of Princess Prag Dei of the Jaswan royal family. With its winding lanes, wooden slate-roofed houses, the village looks nothing less than a miniature painting set on an aisle. As the story goes, in the early 19th century the prosperous Kuthiala Sood community arrived and settled here. These merchants who were well exposed to architecture and arts outside the area, returned to Pragpur to build buildings, chateaus and mansions in architectural styles they observed outside. With their efforts, Pragpur gradually transformed into a grand display of immaculate beauty and spectacular architecture that evolved as a perfect blend of Portuguese, Rajput and British styles. This reminded me of the unique way in which Shekhawati architecture of the havelis, cenotaphs, and stepwells has evolved, with designs taken from different cultures the traders got exposed to.  

To experience the charm of Pragpur, take a walk through the village. The square shaped water pond, in the middle of the village, will lure you to spend some time around it. A village walk introduces you to the architectural beauty strewn across Pragpur. Built before 1868, the Taal is in the center of the village and is surrounded by several old community structures like the Nehar Bhawan, Naun, and Dhunichand Bhardial Serai. The village market by the pond is a bustling place and has an unlikely charm missing from most villages. At a stone throw away distance is the Lala Rerumal’s haveli, with elements of Mughal-styled architecture, and has a large water reservoir. Ancient temples, courtyards, even age-old windows and doors with intricate carvings, leave an everlasting impression on the travelers. Most of these houses exhibit fancy tile-work, ornamental towers, and stained glass windows. It’s like a world merged with old Himachali architecture, where you see an overuse of wood and pillars. Interestingly, the rooftops of these buildings have gables and slanted slopes, which is quite unique considering it seldom snows in the Himalayan foothills. The slanted slopes is a ubiquitous feature in the uphill Kangra and Kullu valley. The village committee is entrusted with restoring and conserving these architectural marvels.

Built before 1868, the Taal is in the center of the Pragpur village
Built before 1868, the Taal is in the center of the village
Old heritage buildings in Pragpur
Old heritage buildings in Pragpur
Heritage mansion in Pragpur
Heritage mansion in Pragpur
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Kalpa: A cultural osmosis

Below flows the roaring Satluj river, snaking its way through the valley, above stands the mighty Kinnaur Kailash as a royal guard, and tucked between these two forces of nature, is the small hamlet of Kalpa. No sooner the bus brakes mooned, wheels screeched, and I got down and framed the first frame of this tucked away paradise, than I fell for its idyllic setting. No doubt the petrifying valleys and heart-warming culture had been a calling of many a travelers. A short, inviting walk through the main road, is enough to warm your heart. Studded with wooden houses, and apple orchards on sides, and uncountable smiles to greet you, Kalpa seems a village taken out of Nora Roberts novel.

Kalpa_life

Never thought a village so small that it can fit in one wide frame of camera lens, can have so many eternal bounties to offer

The first image from the village, that is bound to find a special corner in your heart, is of the Shivling peak (Kinnaur kailash) that rises over 20,000 feet. The peak stands as a royal guard to the village. This idyllic setting of the village, makes one feel that one is sitting in the lap of the holy mountains. Continue reading