Dine with Giraffes in the Manor

A loud screech of our car wheels and the scrunching of gravel beneath it announced our arrival. The sun settled on the manor draped with ivy. With a name like ‘Giraffe Manor’ you expect a more African décor, but it looked straight out of a Scottish folk tale, and only the red dust betrayed its Scottish charm and lent it an African touch. It has nothing of an African appeal, except for the name which it lives upto. Giraffes are not hard to find, looking at you with a friendly gaze. Giraffe Manor lives in the Langata area, a bit outskirts of Nairobi, amid an area of 12 acres, bringing the African safari experience live in surreal charm of English architecture. It is a perfect stop-over after a long flight, to lull the heart and prepare the mind for coming wildlife adventures in the country.

Giraffe Manor_Safari Collection

With a name like ‘Giraffe Manor’ you expect a more African décor, but it looked straight out of a Scottish folk tale.

I was greeted by the punctual warthogs, who had arrived at dot five’ O clock for their share of free snacks, scurrying past me with their tails held straight, like lightning conductors. Continue reading

Advertisements

Lewa: Handpicked Africa…(Part II)

In the next morning safari, I was shamelessly focused on spotting the big cats. Tom wasn’t enthused, he knew cats are elusive, but out in early morning meant more chances. We hadn’t gone much, when we came across a small herd of elephants and in Africa, you couldn’t help but stop when you come across elephants. There is nothing ‘enough of it’ for elephants. As we looked, a young male started walking towards us. He raised his trunk up in the air to familiarize itself with our scent, walked towards an acacia tree, knocked it down to show his prowess and looked at us with intense gaze. It wasn’t giving any signs of a charge, but his actions, by that time, had scared me. He walked closer and was soon within a meter of distance from us. We literally shared glances, like first time lovers on a valentine’s day. I don’t know if elephants smile, but I would still prefer calling that a smiling gesture: or rather a welcoming one. He raised its trunk again, blew a low trumpet to which Tom responded, he jerked his trunk and flapped his ears and the next moment was running his trunk on my face. No issue that my face was covered with elephant’s mucous (being an ardent hindu, I would take that as a blessing of Lord Ganesha). He moved around the car with his usual gesture, seemingly enjoying our company. It was a too close, too personal moment for me.

Elephant@Lewa conservancy

He raised his trunk up in the air to familiarize itself with our scent, walked towards an acacia tree, knocked it down to show his prowess and looked at us with intense gaze.

Continue reading

Camping with lions in Masai Mara– II

From the beginning, I was sure, day 2 was going to be as exciting as day 1. We had by now, tick marked three of the #bigfive of Africa and we prefixed our agenda to first lookout for the remaining two of the big five and then try our chances on the migration yet again. And to a certain degree both looked achievable. We soon added a third wish to this list – spotting a Cheetah. And James smiled, the sort of smile only Gods or elves are allowed to have.

Confession: Two of our wish were fulfilled.

DSC_0030.jpg

So we filled our tummies to the extent possible with left-over fruits and sandwiches and every variety of edible thing available with us and set off to second round of our incredible journey. With full day in hand, we were pretty confident of having all our boxes tick marked.

James wanted to start the morning with Rhino spotting or else we would miss the habitat. We spent almost an hour in the morning to spot a rhino but we weren’t just getting lucky. We however, spotted a big herd of hundreds of buffaloes; the day before we had mostly spotted lone buffaloes. Driving through the grass as they stand mooing was a sight.

Continue reading

Camping with the lions – I

From our camp we could watch baby hippos splash and swill in the waters, while the adults watched us with suspicion. This was my first experience of camping in the wild, and we started with choosing the wrong place. It was only when Leena said “What if hippos come this way to graze?” that we realized, we were way too near the mighty hippos. And in Africa, you don’t mess with the hippos. So we shifted, to a safer place, near the Serena hotels, with the researchers of Hyena Research Center as our neighbors; and practically in the territory of the hyenas. We again smiled at our choice, but our experienced Masai guide James was convinced.

And then setting up of camps begun. Candidly for the first time campers it’s an experience and especially when you are not given enough tools to set up your camp and you have to manage with twigs ‘that can easily bend’ to use instead of iron rods to set your camp. Anyways you don’t learn to manage, you get infected with this art, as you are hit by safari-bug.

Lion_masaimara

The great migration of the animals was in place, and it was a treat time for the Mara lions.

And once we were done with setting our camp, we were off to the thing we were there for – game drive. Continue reading

Watamu – A quintessential tropical paradise…

A quintessential tropical paradise; with thousands of palm trees leaning out across broad, white, pristine sand beaches merging with turquoise waters like inseparable lovers, canoes anchored in crystal clear lagoons and odd coral islands embellished with large swathes of sea kelp in low tide – Oh! These are the places you see in exotic travel magazines. And beyond the beaches is a Kenyan village, in all its noisy muddle, slow paced life, huts of mud and thatched roof and children calling out Jambo. And then at affordable distance is one of the last surviving coastral tropical forests and the vestiges of an old swahilian civilization standing in eerie ruins among the tropical forests.

White, pristine sand beaches merging with turquoise waters like inseparable lovers

White, pristine sand beaches merging with turquoise waters like inseparable lovers

Welcome to Watamu, a small sleepy town, where number of resorts could outnumber the houses, located some 100 Kms from Mombasa, Kenya’s second biggest city and an important trade center. Continue reading